People

newgroup

(Back Row, Left to Right: Matthew Ford, Daniel Johnson, Kellie Vella, Nicole McMahon, David Conroy, Zachary Fitz-Walter, Joshua Hall, Alex Baldwin, Mitchell McEwan. Front Row, Left to Right: Nicole Peever, Amy Inchamnan, Peta Wyeth, Cody Philps, Madison Clark)

Researchers

  • Daniel Johnson (Lab Director): Videogame Player Experience, Measurement of Player Motivation
  • Penny Sweetser: GameFlow, Game Design and Engagement, Young Children and Active Screen Time
  • Peta Wyeth: Game-based Learning, Play-based Accessible Interactions, Play with Tangible and Mobile Technology
  • Zachary Fitz-Walter: Gamification design and user experience

Postgraduate Research Students

  • Alex Baldwin: Multiplayer Dynamic Difficulty Adjustment
  • David Conroy: Game AI and Engagement
  • Joshua Hall: Motivation and Learning Outcomes in Educational Games
  • Mitchell McEwan: Game Play, Control Devices and Engagement
  • Nicole McMahon: Player Personality, Gameplay activities and the Player Experience
  • Kellie Vella: Social Modes of Videogames Play and Wellbeing

 

Associate Professor Daniel Johnson

Dr. Daniel Johnson is a Senior Lecturer in the Bachelor of Games and Interactive Entertainment at QUT. Daniel has completed Bachelors and Honours degrees in Psychology, a Graduate Certificate in Higher Education and a doctorate on the psychology of human-computer interactions and video games. Daniel has also worked in the games industry for companies such as NextGenVideos and The Binary Mill. He recently completed a year as a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Cambridge working for the Engineering Design Centre and remains an Associate Fellow of the Cambridge University Well-being Institute. Over the past decade, Daniel has undertaken numerous consultancies exploring usability, user experience and design issues in mainstream and entertainment software.

Daniel is working on the following projects:

  • Games and Wellbeing
  • Measuring the Play Experience
  • Personality, Motivation and Videogames

Nicole McMahon

Nicole McMahon is a PhD student, research assistant and tutor at QUT. Nicole graduated from the Bachelor of Games and Interaction Entertainment in 2010 with a Games Design major, and completed Honours in Information Technology in 2011. Her research interests include HCI, personality, player types, gameplay activities and the player experience in videogames. Currently, Nicole’s PhD focuses on defining gameplay activities and their impact on the player experience.

Nicole is working on the following projects:

  • Player Personality and Flow
  • Personality, Motivation and Videogames

David Conroy

David Conroy is a PhD student and tutor for several Bachelor of Games and Interactive Entertainment units at QUT. As of writing this, David is in his final year of his PhD which involves research into AI behaviours in First Person Shooter games and their affect on the player. David has also completed a Bachelor degree in Software Technology with a minor in Games Design as well as an Honours degree in Information Technology. David also undertakes research assistance with various colleagues and enjoys making and playing games in his spare time.

David is working on the following projects:

  • Player-like threat based A.I. behaviour in FPS Games

Joshua Hall

Josh is a PhD student, research assistant and tutor for multiple Bachelor of Games and Interactive Entertainment units at QUT. He is currently in the second year of his PhD researching motivation and learning outcomes in educational games. He has completed his Bachelor of Games and Interactive Entertainment and Honours degree in Information Technology at QUT. Josh spends most of his spare time working on hobby game projects and mods.

Josh is working on the following projects:

  • Motivation and Learning Outcomes in Educational Games

Kellie Vella

Kellie Vella is a PhD student and research assistant at QUT. As of writing this Kellie is in her first year of her PhD researching the wellbeing benefits of playing commercial videogames. She has completed Bachelor degrees in Creative Industries (Hon.) and Anthropology, and has worked extensively in community cultural development with the aim of using entertainment and technology to empower disadvantaged young people. She considers her current research to be an extension of this.

Kellie is working on the following projects:

  • Games and Wellbeing

Mitchell McEwan

Mitchell McEwan is a PhD student and Sessional Academic Success Advisor at QUT, as well as the Head Tutor for the University’s Computer Games Studies and Interaction Design units. Mitchell is currently in the second year of his PhD, where he is focused on examining the role that naturally mapped control interfaces have in facilitating the videogame play experience. Mitchell holds a BFA from Mason Gross School of the Arts at Rutgers University in New Jersey, as well as a Master of IT in Games Design from QUT, and has also been involved with cross-discipline research projects at QUT including EcoObservatory and Noise Detectives.

Mitchell is working on the following projects:

  • Naturally Mapped Control Devices and their Impact on the Play Experience

Alex Baldwin

Alex Baldwin is a 2nd-year PhD student conducting research into the area of challenge and player competence normalisation in multiplayer video games. Having graduated from a Bachelor of Games and Interactive Entertainment in 2009 and a subsequent Honours in Information Technology, Alex now tutors multiple game design units. In his spare time Alex enjoys writing, editing and reporting for a prominent Australian game website including representation at events such as E3.

Zachary Fitz-Walter

An associate lecturer with a research focus on gamification, mobile applications and user experience. His primary interests lie in the field of Human Computer Interaction (HCI), focusing on playful experiences and interactions on mobile devices and video games. His phd thesis explored how game design elements embedded into non-game contexts, using mobile technology, can be used as tools of persuasion and engagement.